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Meyer Lemon Barley

  • Author: American Institute for Cancer Research
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 285
  • Total Time: 300

Description

Barley, one of the first grains our ancestors grew, is usually confined to use in vegetable soup. But its slightly chewy and pasta-like texture makes it a versatile ingredient in all kinds of dishes. This chilled side salad contains some protein and a high amount of soluble fiber. Meyer lemon juice and zest provide cancer fighting flavonoids and polyphenols which may prevent inflammation and boost production of detoxifying enzymes in the body. Give barley a try by serving this lemony side dish with fish, poultry, white beans, or vegetables.


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Ingredients

  • 1 cup pearl barley, rinsed and drained
  • 3 cups fat-free, reduced sodium chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1/4 cup chopped loosely packed flat leaf parsley
  • 2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 Tbsp lemon zest
  • 1 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/8 teaspoon fennel seed, whole
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Instructions

  1. In a medium saucepan over high heat, bring barley and broth to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat to medium low, cover, and simmer for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the barley is tender.
  3. Add the garlic and cook for 5 more minutes.
  4. Transfer barley to a fine strainer, drain well, and transfer to bowl.
  5. Cover barley and refrigerate until chilled completely, about 4 hours.
  6. The barley can be refrigerated for up to 3 days before adding the remaining ingredients.
  7. Just before serving, add the parsley, olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, fennel seed, and salt and pepper to taste.
  8. Toss well to combine

Notes

  • Citrus fruits, such as Meyer Lemons, provide powerful Phytochemicals like flavonoids and polyphenols. Flavoniods can be found in apples, citrus fruits, onions, soybeans and soy products (tofu, soy milk, edamame, etc.), coffee and tea and may inhibit inflammation and tumor growth; may aid immunity and boost production of detoxifying enzymes in the body. Polyphenols can be found in green tea, grapes, wine, berries, citrus fruits, apples, whole grains and peanuts and may prevent cancer formation, prevent inflammation and work as antioxidants. These powerful phytochemicals, are naturally occurring plant chemicals (phyto means plant in Greek). They provide plants with color, odor and flavor. Once we eat them, however, research shows they can influence the chemical processes inside our bodies in helpful ways.
  • Find more cancer fighting healthy recipes at https://www.aicr.org/healthyrecipes/

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 10
  • Calories: 176
  • Sugar: 0
  • Sodium: 55
  • Fat: 6
  • Saturated Fat: 1
  • Unsaturated Fat: 4
  • Trans Fat: 0
  • Carbohydrates: 16
  • Protein: 14
  • Cholesterol: 37
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